patient predator

Every day this talented spider catches a tasty collection of flying insects. The web gets rebuilt, morning after morning. What a fantastically effective way to trap flies and other nutritious prey!

This is an orb-weaver spider, probably Araneus diadematus, yet another import from Europe. It is a female – the males of orb-weavers are quite small and difficult to find.

Here’s a great photo essay on A. diadematus, from Nick’s spiders of Europe. (Not one of my blogs, he’s another Nick.)

Males of this species make much smaller webs. If they find a female, they make their web at the outside edge of hers. Like most spiders, their mating is tricky. Males risk their lives as they make forays into the female’s web, looking for some arachnid nooky.

Later this year, she will retire from active trapping. If she’s lucky enough to have mated, replete with eggs she will find a sheltered place and lay her eggs, surrounding them with a sac of silk.

The tiny spiderlings will hatch out in the spring. For a while they will cluster near their birthplace, then spread far and wide. Each one lives two years, overwintering as a young, midsize spider.

A. diadematus is also known as the cross spider. In the picture above, can you see the white cross on her back?

I could not find any male web near this one. Did she find a partner?

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