Archive

Monthly Archives: January 2014

140111-0833

Happy New Year to all friends, clients, associates, colleagues, merchants, family, and other respected humans!

With the new year comes a new beginning for deep nature gardens as a business, and a re-evaluation of all the goals and projects. This new beginning is much more than just switching to a new page in the accounting spreadsheet. There will be some fascinating new offerings in 2014… and I am tremendously curious to see how it all unfolds!

 

140111-0837looking back… and thanks!

2013 was an exciting exploration of what is possible with deep nature gardening as a calling. At the start of the year there were only two clients, and it was not yet clear whether it would be possible to do “professional deep nature gardening.”

Over the following 12 months the work deepened, more clients appeared, and a whole lot was learned. Now it definitely feels like deep nature gardening is “what I do.” It is delightful to see how the various clients’ gardens are becoming more beautiful, diverse, and productive.

There are now 11 active clients, including several with large, fully dedicated deep nature areas, some “mixed work” clients with various extra garden tasks, and even a few who only want me to keep their bushes pruned. All of you are valued and appreciated.

So before I describe some of the Great New Stuff, I want to be sure to thank all of you who have supported this work in any way, whether you are a client, advisor, merchant, compost co-op member, or simply through your continued friendship and emotional support. This amazing new calling would not be possible without you great folks.

 

things to come

In 2014 I hope to continue the good work creating beautiful deep nature gardens, and I want to expand that work in some new directions. In order to make that possible there will be some interesting evolutionary changes.

Now that there are more active clients, I will be inviting one or more apprentices to work with me to become trained in all aspects of deep nature gardening, including pruning, thinning, and identification of all the various plants that appear in deep nature gardens. Over time, these apprentices will help me care for your deep nature gardens, either with me or on their own.

As some garden visits are handled by an apprentice, I will dedicate more of my time to working on several new projects that will benefit all of us.

What new projects? The mindheart swirls with great ideas! All of them involve the three basic foundations of deep nature gardening: beauty, diversity, and productivity.

 

140111-0855ecocells

A big new set of project ideas centers around the concept of an ecocell, which is an enclosed ecosystem. Typically, such an enclosure would be a greenhouse, but ecocells can be of many sizes, from a small indoor terrarium / aquarium, all the way up to a gigantic orbital space habitat. The idea is to create a zone where a controlled ecosystem is separated from the rest of the world.

One of the new projects for 2014 is to create some greenhouse-size ecocells and populate them with beautiful, diverse, productive ecosystems. Since I don’t personally have the space for a greenhouse, an early goal is to find a client who has some property and would like to let me create such a thing, either in an existing greenhouse or in a new one we can construct.

Why build ecocells? Not only are they easier to protect against pests and diseases, they can also be environmentally controlled very precisely. In a tropical ecocell we can grow papayas, bananas and much more. How much better it is to eat totally organic, locally grown papayas instead of shipping them from Mexico!

Do you have some unused space? Can I build an ecocell for you and fill it with beautiful, diverse productivity? Do you know someone who might like this? If so, let’s talk as soon as possible!

 

140111-0901local resilience ecosystem

Most of us have heard of the term “resilience” — it’s a real 21st century buzzword. It means that if things get bad, we can still survive and thrive, taking care of each other by exchanging raw materials and products among ourselves.

One of the most important basics of resilience is going local. This phrase means that as much as possible, we grow our food and create other useful products locally, instead of paying for products that have been shipped halfway across the planet using non-renewable fossil fuels.

I believe so strongly in local resilience that I’m ready to start building an extended local resilience ecosystem (that’s a provisional name until I figure out what to really call it) among the many good people on the central SF peninsula.

Right here in our area there are hundreds of small back yard gardens that already produce all sorts of edible or useful products. Many of us produce more than we can use. We also have tons of devoted home craft workers, making lots of other useful products from knitted scarfs to scented soaps. Why shouldn’t these valuable, producing community members join together cooperatively to form a local resilience ecosystem?

How will this work? To be honest, I’m not sure yet, but stay tuned and you will find out! If you are curious, the best way to follow my progress (our progress!) is to subscribe to this blog, where I will publish updates on this and other new projects for 2014. The subscription box is at the upper right of every page. Of course, I would be utterly delighted if anyone decides to become an active commenter and question-asker. I am actively asking for your good ideas.

Do you (or someone you know) produce more edible bounty than you can use? Do you (or someone you know) create any kind of useful or interesting home-crafted products? Would you like to exchange your own bounty for cool goodies created by other local folks? Would you like to become part of our experimental new local resilience ecosystem? If so, let’s talk as soon as possible!

 

other ideas

There are other ideas too, but I’m going to keep them to myself for now. Between deep nature gardening, ecocells and the local resilience ecosystem I think I have enough on my plate for 2014.

I definitely won’t be able to do these projects alone, and the community of Good Green Folks (that’s all of us!) are critically important to make it happen.

Whether you’d like to be a deep nature gardening apprentice, or you’d like to offer your extra veggies (or hand-crafted products) to the community in exchange for other goodies, or you have some unused space where an ecocell can grow, or you just think what I’m doing is incredibly cool, I hope you’ll get in touch. If you like these ideas, become part of them!

 

onward!

Happy New 2014 to all, and may we all experience great success this year!

Nick Turner

140111-0905

Advertisements