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clouds

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We have clouds and cooler temperatures. Looks like the heat wave has broken.

It’s amazing how different the midsummer days feel here in Oregon, at the same latitude as southern Maine. The sun takes a whole different path through the sky, both lower and longer. It rises in the northeast and sets in the northwest. Nights are short and days are long.

Of course in the winter it will be the opposite, with just a modest slice of daylight, by comparison to the Bay Area.

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We are staying in a cozy house with a productive back yard featuring raised beds and two happy hens named Pepper and Blondie. They lay big, beautiful eggs, each one producing almost one every day. We are greatly enjoying their output, and making friends with them too.

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The stalwart traveling kitty, Stella, looks on from the window.

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It is wonderful to see clouds in the sky again.

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141209-0710

For once, all the weather models agree: We are going to get really, really wet!

As you may be able to discern from the IR view above, the jet stream is aiming right at us, sucking up gigatons of water off the warm ocean between Hawaii and the California coast. Yes, it is one of those iconic “pineapple express” patterns, and this is going to be a big one. We can expect a day of heavy rain and lots of powerful wind.

141209-0712The storm is expected to arrive in the Bay Area early Thursday morning, with rain and wind lasting all day.

If you have outdoor furniture or any other large, light objects now is the time to move them indoors or out of the wind. Check that your gutters and downspouts are clear. If there are lots of fallen leaves in the street, now is a good time to rake them into a pile away from street drains, or put them into the green bin. Better yet, spread those non-conifer leaves across your garden’s open spaces, where they will not only fertilize the earth, but protect it from erosion by heavy rain.

If you have plants in containers out under the sky, especially if they are succulents or cacti, it might be a good idea to move them to a sheltered spot where the rain will not flood them for hours and hours. Some plants might be killed or damaged by prolonged root flooding.

Trees or bushes with extended branches might be damaged by many hours of high winds. You may be able to protect some of these by tying down the long branches or covering the plants with a tarp that is tied firmly to heavy objects like cinder blocks.

If you have an open composting system, it’s a good idea to cover it with a tarp weighted with bricks or other heavy objects. While the compost will not be killed by a long, heavy rain, such a deep soaking will definitely wash many valuable nutrients down into the ground, where they will eventually be lost into the water table.

I am excited that we are finally getting a beautiful, powerful winter storm. This one looks like the biggest one in years. I can’t wait for those first drops, waking me up Thursday morning early. I hope you will enjoy the storm as much as me!

Want to know more about this coming storm? Check out this blog post from WeatherWest.com.

Below: A water vapor picture, showing how the jet stream is sucking up moisture from the ocean.

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At last, it looks like some good rain is coming to the Bay Area. This morning’s sunrise flared up with brilliant red fire, lighting up the landscape with crimson.

There was a brief photography window for about five or six minutes. What an explosion of color!

Sailors (and gardeners) take warning! It’s going to be wet soon.

Yay!

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Now that the 2012 holiday season has finally flown by, it seems like local life is more or less settling down. After the much vaunted but ultimately “invisible” apocalypse and the big December storms, normal life seems like quite a relief. How’s your local life these days?

As of the new year there are now four active deep nature garden projects, including my own. The schedule is full, at least for this month.

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Wet, windy winter weather has definitely had an impact on the gardens. Some plants have been broken or tilted by the winds. Many plants call out for major pruning and thinning. Areas where the ecosystem is relatively new feature large, vigorous pioneers. There are droves of seedlings almost everywhere. Many of them will be removed, leaving behind the most interesting of course.

Here in the blog there are several open threads at the moment.

In the projects we have Elizabeth’s Garden and Little Yellow House, both of which are currently tracking months behind real-time. But we’ll fix that! There are interesting developments coming up in both stories, plus a brand new deep nature garden project, starting with the first official visit tomorrow, January 8. Watch for Porchside Ecology‘s garden story, coming soon.

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There is also the recent mushroom walk, which still has two more exciting installments. As we will see, there can never be too many cool shrooms.

All sorts of interesting life forms are alive in this wonderful, wet time. Finding them and capturing their portraits is a good adventure. Watch for the best ones here.

Happy New Year to all!

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Another winter storm rolls on through bringing wetness and more wetness, turning everything gray and shiny. Not a good day for gardening, but great for growing things.

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What glorious fractal ripples in the transparent water puddles!

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Gray on gray can be beautiful too.

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