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One of our flagship deep nature gardens is called “birch corner.” It has been taking shape since late summer of 2013. With the help of some good tree work from our licensed friends and some power tools wielded by the client, we took out a dead old lawn under a big pistache tree, pruned the tree back to let in more light, and drastically limited a birch (the garden’s namesake tree) that was also stealing light from the garden area below.

The ground under the pistache was shaped into hills and valleys, and a lot of beautiful rocks were added to create a walking path and many step-able access points.

In the past year the garden has grown a wide variety of interesting plants. Some, like several varieties of blueberries, spreading patches of bidens, and yellow lantanas were deliberately planted. But many more, like the fluorescent orange zinnias, burgeoning arums, and drifts of small tree saplings emerged on their own from seeds already present in the soil.

Let’s have a look around!

 

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Above: Viewed from the street, the right (west) side of the garden includes the namesake birch tree at the far right. At the extreme right side of the picture is a wooden fence shading that side, with a climbing rose on it. In the spring and summer this fence is also covered by sweet pea vines, deliberately planted and just now sprouting back up from last year’s dropped seeds.

In the middle of the picture are two large clumps of yellow-flowering bidens, which will soon be limited back before they take over even more space. A clump of hair grass stands at the top of a low berm, and in the back against the fence is a young apricot tree. Also visible are a few rocks and some logs slowly decaying into the ground (trimmed from the pistache tree above).

Below: A closer look at a spreading patch of bidens, with an orange zinnia peeking in at the right.

 

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Below, a patch of cyclamen that was planted last winter near the shady base of the back fence is still thriving and blooming. The base of the apricot tree is at left. A closer look shows many little sprouts of new cyclamen. It looks like it is naturalizing nicely.

 

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In this first year at birch corner we are still encountering a variety of vigorous volunteers that will need to be either limited or removed completely. Among these are the many sprouts of variegated arum, almost all of which will have to go.

There are two (non-chemical) ways of removing arums. The first requires patience – simply pull out all the leaves as they appear, until the tubers below run out of steam. But that method takes some persistence. In coming weeks and months we’ll use the faster approach which is to dig down and actually remove the tubers.

Below, a sampling of the arums at birch corner. Each one has its own particular pattern of leaf variegation. We’ll save a few of the most interesting ones, but they will be kept under control. Some may be moved into containers, where their invasive nature will be tamed and we can enjoy their beautiful leaves, flowers, and the seed heads with their bright red seeds.

 

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Birch corner is a forest floor ecosystem, heavily influenced by a dense drop of leaves from the pistache tree every autumn. Those leaves contribute to a gently acidic soil type, which favors plants like the blueberry showing its fall colors in the picture below.

 

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Here in California, autumn marks the beginning of the winter growing season. At birch corner, one sign of the coming winter is thousands of tiny sprouts of petty spurge and a few other low growing annuals. These will fill in, forming a beautiful green carpet that competes with leaves falling from above.

 

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We leave you with a few more of the many interesting new kinds of plants coming in. How many of these can you identify?

 

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I am happy to announce that with the completion of a certain long-term project in coming weeks there will be a new opening for a regular deep nature garden client (or other interesting commitment!) up to three hours plus per week. This is an exciting opportunity to begin a brand new garden transformation.

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Want to know more? Read about the principles of deep nature gardening. I’m available for long-term garden transformations and in-depth consultations to help you evolve your own deep nature garden.

If a deep nature garden is not quite what you’re looking for, but you’d still like to help support my work, the best way is by spreading the word about what I do. Your kind referrals have always been my lifeblood in this work.

Can you think of anyone in your life that would like to learn more about naturalistic, edible, or artistic gardening? I can give you some business cards, or you can send them to this web site, deepnaturegardens.com.

The new opening in the weekly schedule does not have to be filled by a deep nature garden. It could be an eco-farm greenhouse or an enclosed aquaculture / crop ecosystem. There are other possibilities too. For more creative ideas, look in this site’s top bar under the menu called “our offerings.”

140416-0553Anyone who refers someone who signs up for regular visits or any other paid offering will receive their choice of:

    • dinner with me at an <insert ethnicity> restaurant
    • one hour of garden consultation, in person or on the phone
    • three hours of hands-dirty gardening
    • five eco-packs from our current collection

I’m activating the deep nature referral network… who will turn up the next lead?

Thanks in advance to all the great fans of deep nature gardening! What a cool way to serve the world.

Nick Turner

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Now that the 2012 holiday season has finally flown by, it seems like local life is more or less settling down. After the much vaunted but ultimately “invisible” apocalypse and the big December storms, normal life seems like quite a relief. How’s your local life these days?

As of the new year there are now four active deep nature garden projects, including my own. The schedule is full, at least for this month.

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Wet, windy winter weather has definitely had an impact on the gardens. Some plants have been broken or tilted by the winds. Many plants call out for major pruning and thinning. Areas where the ecosystem is relatively new feature large, vigorous pioneers. There are droves of seedlings almost everywhere. Many of them will be removed, leaving behind the most interesting of course.

Here in the blog there are several open threads at the moment.

In the projects we have Elizabeth’s Garden and Little Yellow House, both of which are currently tracking months behind real-time. But we’ll fix that! There are interesting developments coming up in both stories, plus a brand new deep nature garden project, starting with the first official visit tomorrow, January 8. Watch for Porchside Ecology‘s garden story, coming soon.

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There is also the recent mushroom walk, which still has two more exciting installments. As we will see, there can never be too many cool shrooms.

All sorts of interesting life forms are alive in this wonderful, wet time. Finding them and capturing their portraits is a good adventure. Watch for the best ones here.

Happy New Year to all!